Oh shock, a millennial writer talking about how the world’s changing. What else is new?

Well, a lot actually, because, you know, the world’s changing. All the time, but rapidly now, more than any other period in history.

Change begets change, and the internet launched everything to new heights. People can accomplish in an hour what took our forefathers years.

So how do people decide to use an almost unlimited amount of connectivity and information?

Entertainment, mostly. If the success and size of YouTube are anything to go by. This is the age of media, and tons wants to participate. The change though, is that they now can. If you’re above the age of thirty or so, ask yourself this: “How many people did you know in high school who wanted to be a professional singer/guitarist/writer/painter/maker-of-things? How many wanted to be famous?”

I hope your education was a happy experience, because I imagine you had quite a few flashbacks there.

Now, how many of those people actually became famous? Maybe one, right? Well with the internet, that’s changed. Twitch, YouTube, Etsy, Kickstarter, Soundcloud, Patreon, and believe it or not, even Instagram offer the opportunity to make money off of your creativity, off your already ingrained desire to share with the world. Add in company sponsorships to the mix and you have thousands of people making money this way, sharing this way.

It’s a community of personalities, marketed through guest appearances, cross-overs, and references. One guy likes this guy, who sang a song with this guy, who likes this product and made a video of him using it. And then that product becomes a phenomenon.

Now, how is this useful to you? Well if you’re any kind of business owner, or provider of stuff, then it’s a massive resource. It’s becoming common knowledge that any business wanting to survive needs to be on social media. But you can take it one further: reach out to the creators, there’s already tons of them available.

Like it or not, a lot of millennials don’t want to work within standard corporate structures, and would love the opportunity to create without financial worries. And if you become their sponsor, one can only imagine the outpouring of positive buzz available. One can only imagine the word of mouth.

“Oh, I hear that’s where he gets his sound equipment! Let’s go there!”

If you liked this article, you can read more of Brandon Scott’s work on The Hive, or at his website: www.coolerbs.com.